Last edited by Kelkree
Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

1 edition of RNA turnover in bacteria, archaea and organelles found in the catalog.

RNA turnover in bacteria, archaea and organelles

Lynne Maquat

RNA turnover in bacteria, archaea and organelles

by Lynne Maquat

  • 189 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press/Elsevier in San Diego, Calif .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Prokaryotes,
  • Genetic regulation,
  • RNA-protein interactions,
  • Cell organelles,
  • Messenger RNA

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Lynne E. Maquat, Cecilia M. Arraiano
    SeriesMethods in enzymology -- v. 447
    ContributionsScienceDirect (Online service)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsQP601 .M49 2008 v. 447
    The Physical Object
    Format[electronic resource] /
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25547295M
    ISBN 10012374377X
    ISBN 109780123743770
    OCLC/WorldCa298841379

    Nonproteobacteria Gram-Negative Bacteria and Phototrophic Bacteria; Gram-Positive Bacteria; Deeply Branching Bacteria; Archaea; The Eukaryotes of Microbiology RNA, and Protein; Whole Genome Methods and Pharmaceutical Applications of Genetic Engineering; Gene Therapy;. Books related to RNA Turnover in Eukaryotes: Analysis of Specialized and Quality Control RNA Decay Pathways. Skip this list. RNA Turnover in Bacteria, Archaea and Organelles. Lynne E. Maquat. $ Ratings and Book Reviews (0 0 star ratings 0 reviews) Overall rating. No .

    A prokaryote is a cellular organism that lacks an envelope-enclosed nucleus. The word prokaryote comes from the Greek πρό (pro, 'before') and κάρυον (karyon, 'nut' or 'kernel'). In the two-empire system arising from the work of Édouard Chatton, prokaryotes were classified within the empire Prokaryota. But in the three-domain system, based upon molecular analysis, prokaryotes are. The proteins that archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes share form a common core of cell function, relating mostly to transcription, translation, and nucleotide metabolism. The archaean RNA polymerase and ribosomes are very close to their equivalents in eukaryotes. However, other archaean transcription factors are closer to those found in bacteria.

    Uncovering the mechanisms that underlie the biogenesis and maintenance of eukaryotic organelles is a vibrant and essential area of biological research. In comparison, little attention has been paid to the process of compartmentalization in bacteria and archaea. This lack of attention is in part due to the common misconception that organelles are a unique evolutionary invention of the. 1. Archaea contain only RNA, while bacteria contain both RNA and DNA 2. Only bacteria can evolve 3. Only archaea can be extremophiles 4. The cell walls of each group are made of different materials Review Question Amoebic dysentary is caused by which of the following types of organisms? 1. Viruses 2. Bacteria 3. Protists 4. Fungi.


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RNA turnover in bacteria, archaea and organelles by Lynne Maquat Download PDF EPUB FB2

Purchase RNA Turnover in Bacteria, Archaea and Organelles, Volume - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBNRNA Turnover in Bacteria, Archaea and Organelles. Lynne E. Maquat and Cecilia M.

Arraiano. VolumePages () Receive an update when the latest chapters in this book series are published. Sign in to set up alerts. select article Series Editors. Bacteria, Archaea, and Organelles.

Shimyn Slomovic, Victoria Portnoy, Gadi. RNA turnover in bacteria, archaea and organelles. San Diego, California: Academic Press/Elsevier, © (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Lynne Maquat; Cecilia M Arraiano.

Pris: kr. Inbunden, Skickas inom vardagar. Köp RNA Turnover in Bacteria, Archaea and Organelles av Lynne E Maquat på ISBN: X: OCLC Number: Notes: Auf d.

Buchdeckel: RNA turnover in prokaryotes, archae and organelles. Description: L, Seiten, [3. RNA turnover in prokaryotes, archae, and organelles. bacteria and archea. This book introduces some of the most advanced technologies and small RNA function in RNA decay Characterizing mRNA destabilization mediated by Hfq-binding noncoding RNAs Part II Archaea Methods for the global analysis of mRNA stability in Archaea In vivo and in.

This book focuses on the regulation of transcription and translation in Archaea and arising insights into the evolution of RNA processing pathways. From synthesis to degradation and the implications of gene expression, it presents the current state of knowledge on archaeal RNA biology in 13 chapters.

Topics covered include the modification and maturation of RNAs, the function of small non. RNA Turnover in Bacteria, Archaea and Organelles 作者: Maquat, Lynne E. (EDT)/ Arraiano, Cecilia (EDT) 出版年: 页数: 定价: $ ISBN: 豆瓣评分. Archaea (/ ɑːr ˈ k iː ə / or / ɑːr ˈ k eɪ ə / ar-KEE-ə or ar-KAY-ə) (singular archaeon) constitute a domain of single-celled microorganisms lack cell nuclei and are therefore a were initially classified as bacteria, receiving the name archaebacteria (in the Archaebacteria kingdom), but this classification is obsolete.

Although transcription is the first and most highly regulated step in gene expression, it is usually only the beginning of the series of events required to produce a functional RNA. Most newly synthesized RNAs must be modified in various ways to be converted to their functional forms.

Bacterial mRNAs are an exception; as discussed earlier in this chapter, they are used immediately as templates. Covers the difference in processing of Messenger RNA (mRNA) between eukaryotes, bacteria and archea.

This book introduces some of the most advanced technologies and techniques to identify mRNA processing, transport, localization and turnover which are central to the process of gene expression. Key Terms.

intron: A portion of a split gene that is included in pre-RNA transcripts but is removed during RNA processing and rapidly degraded.; ribosome: Small organelles found in all cells; involved in the production of proteins by translating messenger RNA.; polymerase: Any of various enzymes that catalyze the formation of polymers of DNA or RNA using an existing strand of DNA or RNA as a.

Get this from a library. RNA turnover in prokaryotes, archae, and organelles. [Lynne Maquat; Cecilia M Arraiano;] -- Specific complexes of protein and RNA carry out many essential biological functions, including RNA processing, RNA turnover, RNA folding, as.

Small RNA regulators (sRNAs) have been identified in a wide range of bacteria and found to play critical regulatory roles in many processes. The major families of sRNAs include true antisense RNAs, synthesized from the strand complementary to the mRNA they regulate, sRNAs that also act by pairing but have limited complementarity with their targets, and sRNAs that regulate proteins by binding.

INTRODUCTION. Polyadenylation is an important post-transcriptional modification of prokaryotic, eukaryotic and organellar RNA. In bacteria, archaea and organelles, such as plant mitochondria and chloroplasts, polyadenylation is transient and occurs mainly on fragmented molecules as part of the RNA decay pathway (1–3).In general, this process consists sequentially of.

To fill the void, this volume, which addresses RNA turnover in bacteria, archaea, and organelles, and two companion volumes (Volumes and ), which focus on RNA turnover in eukaryotes, are hoped to serve both as useful references for specialists in the field and as a helpful guides for the broader community of research scientists wishing.

The figure shows (A) the life cycle in bacteria and organelles, and (B) the life cycle of the ORF associated with a group I intron in Archaea. Pre-tRNAs in bacteria and organelles present introns in the anticodon stem that are group I ribozyme-like, but they do not have an ORF (40).

Archaea and Bacteria do not possess membrane found organelles or nucleus. They have similar size and shape. Archaea: They are single-celled organisms that comprise cells with distinct properties that make them unique from the other two domains of life, namely Eukaryota and Bacteria. Figure 1 This phylogenetic tree was constructed by microbiologist Carl Woese using data obtained from sequencing ribosomal RNA genes.

The tree shows the separation of living organisms into three domains: Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. Bacteria and Archaea are prokaryotes, single-celled organisms lacking intracellular organelles.

This review discusses the current state of knowledge regarding polyadenylation and its functions in bacteria, organelles, and Archaea. WIREs RNA 2 – DOI: /wrna This article is categorized under: RNA Processing > 3' End Processing RNA Turnover and Surveillance > Turnover/Surveillance Mechanisms.

In cell biology, an organelle is a part of a cell that does a specific job. Organelles typically have their own plasma membrane round them.

Most of the cell's organelles are in the cytoplasm. The name organelle comes from the idea that these structures are to cells what an organ is to the body. There are many types of organelles in eukaryotic cells.The exosome is the polynucleotidylation enzyme. The detection of poly(A)-rich tails in S.

solfataricus and S. acidocaldarius raised the question as to which enzyme catalyses polynucleotidylation in these Archaea. The poly(A) polymerases of eukaryotes and bacteria belong to different classes of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily, together with the CCA-adding enzymes (Yue et al, ).Ribosomes are tiny spherical organelles that make proteins by joining amino acids together.

Many ribosomes are found free in the cytosol, while others are attached to the rough endoplasmic reticulum. The purpose of the ribosome is to translate messenger RNA (mRNA) to proteins with the aid of tRNA.